Posted in: Reviews

In the Dark episode 3 review: Daddy was a liar

After two weeks of pretty standard British crime fare, In the Dark has veered way off course for its second half. No longer are we dealing with a standard whodunit, a dead school girl and an historic sexual abuse case handed instead a lazy gender-flipped fridging for Helen’s boyfriend and a tacked on look at...

Torchwood: Cascade review

Internet piracy comes with consequences in the new Torchwood adventure. Here’s our review… Scott Handcock, regular director of the Big Finish Torchwood range wrote the latest release, Cascade, or to give it its full name, Torchwood_Cascade_Rip.tor. It’s another tale for Naoko Mori, reprising Toshiko Santo and takes its title from the murky world of internet...

In the Dark review: What now?

In the Dark episode 1 & 2 review There’s a certain comfort to crime dramas – a predictable structure that, while allowing us to theorise and wonder about the ‘whodunnit’ aspect, ensures we know a few things going in. There will be several convincing red herrings, personal drama of the detectives dragged in, and the...

Broken finale review: a tapestry of hope in the face of suffering

The seemingly contradictory nature of deep religion versus personal responsibility has always fascinated me. If everything happens for a reason then why do so many things cause us anger and pain? Is it simply a test from God to rise above these feelings, or – as posited in this episode – an invitation to target...

The Scarifyers 10 – The Gnomes of Death audio review

Released by Bafflegab 30th June 2017 Returning after an extended gap, The Scarifyers are back in action, this time dealing with an infestation of malevolent garden ornamentation. For the uninitiated, The Scarifyers follows the 1930s exploits of ghost-story writer Professor Dunning (Terry Molloy, Davros in 1980’s Doctor Who), and former Police Officer Harry “Thumper” Crow...

Doctor Who series 10 episode 12: The Doctor Falls review (spoilers)

Spoilers There’s two types of Doctor Who: one intended to make you think, and one intended to make you feel. It’s a popular consensus that the former is Steven Moffat’s style, defined by intricate puzzle-box plotlines and mind-bending hard sci-fi concepts, and the latter is Russell T Davies’, defined by grounded and relatable characters and...